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Friday, December 20, 2013

The Carrier Address-- A Newspaper New Year's Tradition

The Rosen-blog will be going on vacation until after the new year, so we're leaving you with a New Year's item from our collections--a carrier's address from January 1, 1848. Carriers' addresses were New Year's verses that were printed annually by many papers and delivered by newsboys in search of holiday tips.


Carrier’s address of the National Police Gazette, January 1st, 1848. A 848n. Rosenbach Museum & Library
The following description of this intriguing object comes from former Education Department member Aisha Madhi:

What would the holiday season be without reflecting on the year that has passed?  In that spirit, the National Police Gazette published this sensationalist broadside recounting New York’s crimes of 1847. The popular publication served as an early version of tabloid journalism, exposing its readers to the lurid underworld of urban crime.  The colorful cast of criminals depicted here includes burglars, con men, pickpockets and murderers, with names like One-Eyed Thompson.

For more on this interesting genre of publishing, check out the Brown University Library's site on carrier addresses. 

See you in 2014!




Kathy Haas is the Associate Curator at the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

 

Friday, December 13, 2013

Snow Fun

The recent precipitation has precipitated my desire to showcase some of the wonderful snow and ice sculptures that I have run across in my travels around the web. They're not necessarily local, or from this year, but they seemed in the Rosen-spirit to me.

Here's a great Wild Thing snow sculpture from 2009.

Max and the Wild Thing
Photograph by Eric Bartholomew. Available under Creative Commons 2.0 licence.

This ice sculpture appeared at the 2009 Winter Carnival in St. Paul, MN. It is a detail of a larger Alice-themed sculpture which you can see here.

The Cheshire Cat
Photograph by Mykl Roventine. Available under Creative Commons 2.0 license.
You can check out another Cheshire snow-cat --decked out with food-coloring and Kool-Aid paint--on the Boardman Neighbors website.  You can also find some great literary snow sculptures (including the Jabberwocky, Poe's raven, and the marlin from the Old Man and the Sea) in this post about the Ely Winter Fest in Ely, Minnesota

I don't know what book this pair is reading, but whatever it is, it seems good, and what better thing to do on a snowy day than to enjoy (and share) a good book. So stay warm and read well.

Reading a Book
Photograph by Lena LeRay. Available under Creative Commons 2.0 license.



Kathy Haas is the Associate Curator at the Rosenbach Museum & Library.

 

Friday, December 06, 2013

All his books were put in his room

Whether you've just wrapped up your holiday gift-giving or you're currently planning and shopping, I thought this letter from Eleanor Elkins Widener offered a poignant reminder of the power of holiday traditions.


Eleanor Elkins Widener, autograph letter signed to Philip H. Rosenbach. [December 1912?]. RCo I:181:31
Eleanor Elkins Widener, autograph letter signed to Philip H. Rosenbach. [December 1912?]. RCo I:181:31
Eleanor Elkins Widener, autograph letter signed to Philip H. Rosenbach. [December 1912?]. RCo I:181:31

Mrs. Widener's son,  Harry Elkins Widener died on the Titanic on April 15, 1912.  A young book-collector, Harry had been Dr. Rosenbach's client, friend, and protege. After his death, his mother continued to acquire books that he had wanted, eventually donating his collection to Harvard (along with a new library to hold it) in accordance with Harry's wishes.

This letter, written on mourning paper, presumably dates from December 1912 and speaks of the solace Mrs. Widener found in Harry's collection and in continuing holiday traditions. She had always bought Harry books for Christmas and here she writes to Philip Rosenbach, thanking him and Dr. R for a printed tribute Dr. Rosenbach had produced, and then explaining  "I must also thank you for the Xmas present you sent him. All his books were put in his room the same as each year, whilst we could not see him--I know he was with us."




Kathy Haas is the Associate Curator at the Rosenbach Museum & Library.